Doorless Shower Design

Bathroom decor

Bathroom design

When remodeling the design of your bathroom in Mesa or building one in new construction, doorless showers open a world of possibilities.  They are very new and trending.  You will continue to hear more about them.  Universal design and an open shower are two of the benefits of doorless showers. Your first experience with this type of shower can be that of a “confused” feeling trying to figure out how this works functionally.  You just walk into a shower with no doors and a grate on the floor. No tub, no door, nor curtain, and no threshold.  It’s a large showering space with very little constraints. Below are some things to consider when planning or designing your doorless shower.

Add a half wall to protect against splashes

Ideally, an open shower requires at least a 6-foot buffer zone on every side to avoid flooding the rest of the bathroom with water. But a half-wall that divides a shower from the vanity, can help to contain water droplets and splashes.

Consider a corner location if possible

Orient the shower in a corner that faces away from the other bathroom zones. Not only does this guard against spraying water, but it also preserves some measure of privacy.

Prepare to face a chilly situation

There’s no getting around it — open showers can be drafty, especially in the winter months. Installing a heat lamp and radiant heat bathroom flooring can offset the shivers. Mount a heated towel rack nearby  (another new shower trend), and you’ll be extra warm as you dry off.

Choose an appropriate showerhead

One of the most critical components of a shower be it new or traditional.  A standard shower head shoots water down at an angle.  We have all experienced a time when the water was shooting out at an angle that promoted a wet bathroom floor.  Opt for a rain-style model, which casts water straight down, or a handheld type that allows you to control the position and flow. If you do use a more conventional model, mount it so that the spray hits an opposite wall rather than the shower opening.

How to choose a shower drain

At the core of every great shower is a great shower drain. But which drain is the right one for your shower? It’s simple: the best drain for your shower is the one you love the look of and that meets the requirements of the job. New Jersey might have some special code that makes the choice harder, but for the most part the sky is the limit. It all depends on what’s right for you.  Drains do more than look pretty — the good ones can deliver on both style and function.

Ensure proper drainage

Not only will you guard against damage from standing water, but you’ll also protect yourself from sliding on wet floors. Angle the shower floor slightly so that water flows toward the drain, and think about adding a second drain for doubling the drainage.

Select surfaces that can stand up to moisture

Even with careful attention to an open shower’s design, splashes and steam will escape. Outfit your bath with surfaces that hold their own against moisture: porcelain or glass tile, metal, stone, solid surfacing, engineered quartz and some woods. Avoid fabrics and other materials that are prone to mildew.

Make peace with a loss of privacy

If you don’t like to feel exposed — even when you’re alone in the house — an open shower may not be for you. Even if you don’t have a bare window wall.  You’ll be on full view from the rest of the bathroom. Consider a frosted or textured glass half-wall as a compromise if modesty is an issue.

Integrate the design with the rest of the space

Because there’s no concrete border between an open shower and its surroundings, choose materials that will create a smooth transition. A good selection is a threshold that continues seamlessly into the shower, with only a change in ceiling materials to provide a visual stopping point.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: